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Love Brings Discipline

Father, it is right that You would discipline us in your love. It is right that You would discipline us according to Your laws & statutes. Father, it is good & right that You would press us toward holiness & righteousness, selflessness & servitude. Thank You for loving us enough to stop us in our tracks and to bring us to correction in You through the blood of Jesus Christ. Give us wisdom so we can see, a heart of humility so we can listen. Thank You for treating us as sons & daughters. Amen.

Hebrews 12:1-11
Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.

Consider him who endured from sinners such hostility against himself, so that you may not grow weary or fainthearted. In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood. And have you forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as sons?

“My son, do not regard lightly the discipline of the Lord,
    nor be weary when reproved by him.
For the Lord disciplines the one he loves,
    and chastises every son whom he receives.”

It is for discipline that you have to endure. God is treating you as sons. For what son is there whom his father does not discipline? If you are left without discipline, in which all have participated, then you are illegitimate children and not sons. Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live? 10 For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness. 11 For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

I have done things I should never have done. I have said things I never should have said. I have had thoughts that should never be entertained. I have harbored attitudes that I never should have allowed to foster in my heart. I am guilty. I am self-condemned.

I am so thankful for discipline. When I was a child, a toddler, my parents loved me enough to discipline me if I was doing something stupid. They had to discipline me not to run out in the road, not to stick things in electrical outlets, not to touch a hot stove. I am thankful that they loved me enough to discipline my actions. When I got older, I had to learn other disciplines so I could stay healthy and alive. I can remember being in Washington D.C. and on multiple, multiple occasions, one of my parents had to grab me by the collar to stop me from walking into traffic because I was too busy looking at everything around me to notice what was right in front of me. That lesson they began teaching me as a toddler they had to reinforce when I was 12 & 13 years old. I am still here today because someone loved me enough to discipline me, to correct me and to help me change my behavior, even though that meant I needed discipline over the long haul in the same areas.

Somewhere around age 18 (=+/- a few years) in America, we start to get defensive when people keep disciplining us. When people offer correction we begin to step over that line of it being helpful to it becoming insulting. We resist discipline, we fight it, and we cease to see its usefulness in our life. We figure that we have grown up now, and that we don’t need anyone to tell us what to do. And so we tend to ignore discipline. We see those who would correct us as being oppressive or overbearing. We want to do things our way & so we begin to view God as some kind of cosmic Principal who we only ever hear from when we’ve done something wrong.

But in Scripture, we see this teaching over and over again. Only a fool despises discipline and rejects it. When discipline comes, it comes from love, and God is a good Father to love us this way. He doesn’t just allow us to wander into the middle of moral issues. He offers guidance, correction & discipline when we wander. When we do things that are contrary to His desires for us, and that drag us away from walking in holiness, He lovingly corrects us, disciplining us as He sees fit. It is right & good that He would do this. If He didn’t, He wouldn’t be a very good Father. He’s not all cuddles & cupcakes. Sometimes God has to wield the ‘rod of correction’ in our life so that we find ourselves desiring to get back on track, but He isn’t some uncaring authority figure looming over us just waiting to hit us with a switch.

The author of Hebrews very clearly says that if we don’t receive discipline, then we should be worried, because that would mean that we weren’t His, that we weren’t a part of His family. And so we gladly endure His discipline, knowing that it comes from the deepest love we will ever experience. We endure it because we see that God intends His glory & our good to come from it. We endure it because we love Him in return, and because we want to look & act like Jesus, from the tops of our heads to the bottom of our feet. Our whole self being conformed to His image. There is a fruit of righteousness that comes form enduring His discipline, and if He loves us enough to do this work in us, we shouldn’t desire to miss a moment of it.

We should seek correction, walking in a mindset & heart of repentance. We should be ever mindful of thoughts and attitudes within us that do not honor God, working to take every thought captive. There is a degree to which we should exercise self-discipline & self-control, those are evidence of the Holy Spirit at work in us. But we should also be ready at any moment to receive this good discipline from God, our hearts ready and willing to submit to His good love. Learning from Him & being disciplined by Him teaches us, as disciplined disciples, to walk in His rhythms of grace & that is a very good thing.

Father, it is right that You would discipline us in your love. It is right that You would discipline us according to Your laws & statutes. Father, it is good & right that You would press us toward holiness & righteousness, selflessness & servitude. Thank You for loving us enough to stop us in our tracks and to bring us to correction in You through the blood of Jesus Christ. Give us wisdom so we can see, a heart of humility so we can listen. Thank You for treating us as sons & daughters. Amen.

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Jesus’ Pre-Passion Prayer Pt3

Father, unity with others comes at a price. Unity with You comes at an even deeper price. Give us strength to sacrifice our pride, nailing it to the cross with Jesus. Give us the strength to die, to see with eyes of one looking back over their life as we draw our final breath, so that we might have eyes to see those things that would fill us with regret, and let us lay those sinful inclinations down to die so that we might live. Let us live in unity with You. Cleanse us, refine us and let us walk in Your glory through the sacrifice of Jesus. Amen.

John 17:20-26
20 “I do not ask for these only, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, 21 that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. 22 The glory that you have given me I have given to them, that they may be one even as we are one, 23 I in them and you in me, that they may become perfectly one, so that the world may know that you sent me and loved them even as you loved me.

24 Father, I desire that they also, whom you have given me, may be with me where I am, to see my glory that you have given me because you loved me before the foundation of the world. 25 O righteous Father, even though the world does not know you, I know you, and these know that you have sent me. 26 I made known to them your name, and I will continue to make it known, that the love with which you have loved me may be in them, and I in them.”

This High Priestly prayer of Jesus is arguably one of the most beautiful parts of all of Scripture. Of all the gifts that God has given us in His Word, this shines out as a gem on the crown of the Gospel message. Jesus did not have to pray this prayer out loud, but He did, and He did it for our benefit. He speaks frankly with the Father, He speaks plainly for His disciples, and He speaks plainly for us. We see the desire of His heart, and we see our deep need for Him. And where we stand unworthy, He seeks simply to redeem us from our unworthiness.

Those days when we don’t feel worthy, when we don’t feel loved, lovable or worthwhile, Jesus calls out to us and says, “Listen to this! I asked God for you. I want you to believe in Me, and be drawn into this deep, abiding relationship with Me. You are worthwhile, and God will be glorified in this.” Because while it is ultimately all about God and His glory, we also see that God is glorified, and this pleases Him, when we walk in unity with the truth, and with Him. And this is what Jesus set about to do.

This relationship will stand as testimony to the whole world of His goodness, mercy, grace and loving-kindness. Your life and mine stand as a love letter, read out loud, just like this prayer was spoken out loud. God didn’t have to do things this way, but He chose to so that more and more might see and hear and be brought to salvation through Jesus Christ. He has made it known, and He will continue to make it known, because it glorifies God and it redeems us.

The world will reject us. They do not know Christ. Romans 3 reminds us:

What then? Are we Jews any better off? No, not at all. For we have already charged that all, both Jews and Greeks, are under sin, 10 as it is written:

“None is righteous, no, not one;
11     no one understands;
    no one seeks for God.
12 All have turned aside; together they have become worthless;
    no one does good,
    not even one.”


Even in the face of our sin, Jesus prayed this prayer. While we were still sinners, Christ died for us. This is grace. This is the rhythm we walk in with Jesus as we seek unity, daily, with the Father, and the rhythm that brings joy into our lives. Let us pause, remember and seek His wisdom & glory for this day.

Father, unity with others comes at a price. Unity with You comes at an even deeper price. Give us strength to sacrifice our pride, nailing it to the cross with Jesus. Give us the strength to die, to see with eyes of one looking back over their life as we draw our final breath, so that we might have eyes to see those things that would fill us with regret, and let us lay those sinful inclinations down to die so that we might live. Let us live in unity with You. Cleanse us, refine us and let us walk in Your glory through the sacrifice of Jesus. Amen.

The Rhetoric for Life in the Heart of God

Father, today we find set before us life and death. In everything we do, may we choose life. Amen.

“On January 22, 1973, the US Supreme Court decided in Roe v Wade that a mother has the legal right to end her pregnancy up until the point at which the baby can live outside of her womb. We lament the death of each child lost to abortion. We pray for each parent who has chosen to terminate a pregnancy. And we commit to become a people who welcome life in a culture of death.” – Jonathan Hartgrove

“The world is going mad in mutual extermination, and murder, considered as a crime when committed individually, becomes a virtue when it is committed by large numbers. It is the multiplication of the frenzy that assures impunity to the assassins.”
– Cyprian of Carthage

Ephesians 2:1-10
1 And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience— among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind. But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved— and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast. 10 For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

We can argue points and policy until we are blue in the face. When it comes down to it, as a Christian, we must seek the wisdom and direction of God in all things, in every occasion. For those who walk with Christ, then, it should be no surprise that we will always have a strong rhetoric for life and the preservation of life, because that is what we see at work in the heart of God.

Paul repeats what we have all felt before. We were dead. Dead in our sin. Dead because of our offense against God. We were doomed, damned and determined for hell. As Paul said, “We were, by nature, children of wrath.” Destined to stand before God, facing extermination because of our sin, we had no hope within us, nor strength to change our situation. And while it may have been easier to finish us off, we find a different impulse within the heart of God.

“But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ – by grace you have been saved”

This is the heart of God. For His glory and for the preservation of the life He created, He drew us, who were dead, into life. He redeemed us from the heap, and returned to us the joy that comes with life & salvation. He raised us up from that state of destruction and placed us somewhere we did not deserve, seated in a place of favor in His presence. This gift of God comes because of His grace, and with an intention, that we would do good works, walking the path prepared for us.

Since this is the case, there should always be a strong rhetoric for life at work in the hearts of those who follow Christ. There should always be a drive to protect and preserve life, whether in the womb or stretched out somewhere along the years that follow. Every life matters, every person is deeply loved and cared for. And despite living in a culture that worships and celebrates death, we stand for life. We are -for- life in every way imaginable, with all of the implications that come with that stance. We agree and say ‘Yes & Amen!’

Because of what God did for us, because of the drive for life that He has shown to us, because of the lengths that He went to to preserve our own lives, we can never look at another human being, inside or outside the womb, and agree to their destruction. God saw us, lost, broken and deserving death and He provided a way for life instead…and so we are a people of life, echoing the heart of our Savior.

This isn’t a political issue. This is a sin issue. We ourselves have been defended, we ourselves must stand to defend. We ourselves have been loved beyond measure. We ourselves must stand for love, life and equality of value for every human being on this planet. It doesn’t matter how loud the voice of death becomes, we find life granted to us, and so we strive and fight to see it maintained. This is love. This is what God would have us echo to everyone, everywhere. There is a rhetoric for life & love, intimately folded within the fabric and patterns of the rhythms of grace.

“But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ – by grace you have been saved”

Father, today we find set before us life and death. In everything we do, may we choose life. Amen.

Romans 3:1-8 // Righteousness, Unrighteousness, Lies & Truth

“1 So what advantage does the Jew have? Or what is the benefit of circumcision? 2 Considerable in every way. First, they were entrusted with the spoken words of God. 3 What then? If some did not believe, will their unbelief cancel God’s faithfulness? 4 Absolutely not! God must be true, even if everyone is a liar, as it is written:

‘That You may be justified in Your words

and triumph when You judge.’

5 But if our unrighteousness highlights God’s righteousness, what are we to say? I use a human argument: Is God unrighteous to inflict wrath? 6 Absolutely not! Otherwise, how will God judge the world? 7 But if by my lie God’s truth is amplified to His glory, why am I also still judged as a sinner? 8 And why not say, just as some people slanderously claim we say, ‘Let us do what is evil so that good may come? Their condemnation is deserved!'”

Romans 3:1-8

==

Does my sin simply amplify God’s glory? Does my malfeasance increase His grace? Does my misbehavior prove His love?

No. My sin is still sin, even if it stands as the proving ground for His love & righteousness. The fact that He is glorified when He saves me does nothing to justify my actions when they are based in unrighteousness. God’s wrath and justice are not so backwards, nor is His righteousness so fragile as to have to fit to my actions and misunderstandings. He stands righteous above all, unchanging and unchangable. He is Righteousness. He is Justice. And without Him, I am nothing but a sinful, lost soul standing in rebellion against Him and everything He examples & desires. God is right when He judges us. He is right when He does anything. He is perfection. 

So, as Paul explores the relationship between man & God, this conversation about righteousness and how we view ourselves (inside & out) is something that must come up. We cannot examine life with God and not examine our lives as lived with Him, how we are changed and undone by Him, being remade into the likeness of Christ. 

But while we are being changed, we must confront our sin. And when we confront our sin, we cannot put blame or pressure on anyone but ourselves. We cannot suppose that in our sin, God places any kind of approval on our choices. We only walk in His favor when we walk in His righteousness. And we only walk in His righteousness when we walk clothed in Christ. Everything done outside of His will is inherently an act of rebellion. His grace covers us when we slip into these times, but it does not excuse what we have chosen to do. 

As we GoLove others in the Name of Christ, we must be mindful of our own actions as we preach the Gospel. Later in chapter 14, Paul will impress upon us not to condemn ourselves by what we approve. If we claim Christ, and walk in the righteousness of God, then we must walk as Christ, prusuing a humble life in Him, denying the impulses of the flesh. This comes as a gift, a result of His righteousness at work in us. Without Him, we are unable to fight against sin and we stand bare before the judgment of God. But when we do walk with Him, we come to understand that path that He blazed before us more and more. That path of righteousness that points toward Him & glorifies Him. That is where God is glorified in us, not in our sin, but in righteousness, His righteousness at work in us. 

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